Real Engineering
 

The Future Of Airliners?


 

What's The Biggest Machine In The World?


 

The Material Of The Future


 

Why Are The Dreamliners Windows So Big?

Have you ever flown in the 787 Dreamliner?  Boeing’s new composite passenger has windows that are much larger than your average passenger plane. In this video I answer why the engineers at Boeing could risk making the windows so big.


 

The Greatest Innovations In Formula One

Racing is the perfect platform to generate healthy rivalry between opposing engineering teams. Racing’s history is full of riveting and fascinating stories of innovation. I explore some of my favourite advances in automotive technology in this video.


 

The History Of Iron And Steel 

Did you know that iron and steel are essentially the same material with only small differences in alloying compounds? In this video I follow the history iron and steel, from when humans first learned how to extract iron from its ore to the mass manufacturing techniques of steel that spurred the industrial revolution.


 

Why Are I-Beams Shaped Like an I?

I-beams form the skeleton of all our largest structures. Why are they shaped like that? It’s a simple question, but the answer will give you insight into how nearly every load bearing structure in the world is designed.


 

Why Build Higher?

As human populations grow our cities have grown in height, but not everyone is happy with the this trend. In this video I make an argument for why cities should be rethinking their building regulations to encourage taller buildings.


 

Burj Khalifa - How To Build Higher

Last September I travelled to Dubai to visit my Mother, who lives right next to the Burj Khalifa. I was absolutely blown away by the buildings height. I used to watch the world’s former tallest buildings, the Petronas Twin towers glimmer in the distance every evening after work, but the Burj Khalifa is almost twice the height. It got me thinking about how the engineers overcame the challenges that faced them. I discover the ingenious solutions that they came up with in this video.


 

Material Properties 101

I use a lot of technical language in my videos. This video will give you a better understanding of the vocabularly I use to describe materials.


 

Transistors - The Invention That Changed The World

Transistors form the backbone of all our modern technology. The smartphone in your pocket contains billions of these tiny devices. How do they work and how do they allow our computers to perform vasts amounts of calculations per second? I explain how in this video.


 

Aluminium - The Material That Changed The World

Aluminium was once the most expensive material on earth. Napolean served his most esteemed guests food on aluminium plates, while others had to make do with gold. Today it is one of the cheapest metals in the world and is used to wrap your roast chicken. It also allowed humans to take to the skies in droves. Discover the amazing journey of aluminium in this video.


 

The Spitfires Fatal Flaw

The Spitfire is one of the world's most beloved planes. This iconic plane is often credited as the saviour of Britain during WW2, but it had a fatal flaw when it first took to the skies. I explain how this flaw affected the plane and how it was solved in this video.


 

Can We Create Artificial Gravity?

One of the primary problems humans face when travelling in space is the atrophy our bodies endure in microgravity. Scott Kelly recently spent 1 year in space, while his twin brother remained on earth so we could learn how microgravity affects the human body. But can we avoid the problem altogether? Can we create artificial gravity? I discuss the physics and how much it would cost to build a spaceship with artificial gravity in this video.


 

Steam Engine - How Does It Work

Steam engines were once one of the most advanced technologies on earth, but early steam engines were incredibly inefficient and were only useful to coal mines that had a plentiful supply of fuel. In this video I delve into the gradual improvement of steam engines and the eventual invention of steam turbines that still provide the majority of our energy today.


 

Stealth - How Does it Work? (Northrop B-2 Spirit)

The Northtrop B-2 Spirit is one of the most iconic planes ever invented. The flying wing design allows the plane to cut through enemy radar defences, appearing no larger than a bird on their radar screens. Learn how this amazing technology works in this video.


 

Winglets - How Do They Work? (ft. Wendover Productions)

Have you ever looked out the window of your plane and wondered what those curly bits at the end of the wing were for? In this video collaboration with Wendover Productions I explain why engineers needed to find ways to decrease the fuel consumptions of planes in 1973 and how those devices (called winglets) work.


 

Why Do Wind Turbines Have Three Blades?

If costs (and physics) were not an issue, the ideal wind turbine would have an infinite amount of thin blades. In this video I briefly explain why wind turbines have three blades.


 

Hyperloop - The Future of Travel? 

The Hyperloop has received a lot of hype as the future of intercity transport. In this video I explain the basic physics behind the project.


 

Why Are Plane Wings Angled Backwards

Airplane wings generally don’t point forward (the russian SU-47 being on of the few exceptions), sometimes they are straight, but all planes that can approach the speed of sound have their wings pointing backwards. Learn why in this video.


 

The Wright Brothers Didn't Invent Flight

The Wright Brothers are often credited with inventing flight. In this video I explore what they really invented and why they deserve the accolade of perfecting early flight.


 

Why Are Plane Windows Round?

In this short little video I explain why airplane windows changed from being square to being round. This is the first video I made with the blueprint animation style.  I had just quit my job to start this channel when I released this video. I was not expecting to get viral success on my first try, but this video reached nearly half a million views in its first 2 weeks.